Language / Grammar, The Verb "To Be" - Present Tense

The Verb “To Be” – Present Tense


This week we are learning about the verb “to be” in English. The verb “to be” can be a tricky thing to teach to. Try these simple activities to get your students up and moving so they are excited about English! Remember the verb “to be” in the present is just three simple words: is / am / are. This is super important for everyone to develop an understanding before they begin to form sentences.

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Look at the bottom for a link to 1 FREE download to complete this lesson!

What you need:

Remember to look at the bottom for a link to digital downloads + 1 FREE download to complete this lesson!

  1. Sorting activity (download)
  2. Verb “to be” worksheet (download)
  3. Introduction: The verb “to be” PowerPoint (download)
  4. Verb “to be” game PowerPoint (download)
  5. Three cups (or cut old water bottles and use as cups!)
  6. Play dough or clay
  7. Ball or soft toy

Preparation:

All preparation is optional and can be adjusted according to your classroom!

  • Download and view the Introduction: The verb “to be” PowerPoint.
  • Print sorting activity and prepare 3 cups with labels “is/am/are”
  • Print verb “to be” worksheet

How to teach:

There are various things you can do with the resources I have created. Check out the brief lesson plan I’ve created that focuses on how to teach in a 45 minute period.

Introduction: 10 minutes

  • Introduce the topic of the verb “to be” by drawing the verb chart on the board or showing the Introduction: The verb “to be” PowerPoint.
    • Bomb ball: Students must stand in a circle and pass a ball around while music is playing. Teacher should randomly stop the music and whichever student is holding the ball must use the word is/am/are in a sentence. Correct students accordingly and makes sure they are referencing the verb chart from the verb “to be” PowerPoint. If a student cannot use the word in a sentence they must sit down. You can play until each word has been introduced with two examples or until there are few students standing.

Lesson Proper: 25 minutes

  • Activity 1: Use the sorting activity and three cups (or recycled water bottles) labeled is/am/are to play a racing game. Split the class into small groups and scatter the sorting activity cards on the floor. Each group must race to place all of their cards into the correct cups. If you have a large space allow each team to line up and come up one at a time to choose 1 card to sort. Then, the student must high five the next in line before their team switches players. When the teams are finished check their answers and the fastest team is the winner! This activity can also be completed alone.
  • Activity 2: Use the Verb “to be” play dough game and give each student a small ball of play dough. Play the PowerPoint and allow students to create their answer by spelling out each word in play dough. If students are advance you can also play as a team game. Split the class into small groups and give each a ball of play dough. Allow students to race to complete the question. Give the fastest team 1 bonus point and give each correct team 1 point. The team at the end with the most points is the winner!

Conclusion: 10 minutes

  • Worksheet: Use the Verb “to be” worksheet to assess the students’ individual understanding. Allow the students to complete the worksheet independently for 5 minutes. Then, use the remaining 5 minutes to check the answers as a class.

Activity 1:
Use the sorting activity and 3 cups (labeled is/am/are) to test your students. You can use these resources in small groups or prepare enough for each student in the class. See the detailed version of a fast paced game above.



Activity 2:
Use the Verb “to be” play dough game and present to your class. Allow students to work as individuals or in a group to fill in the blank by spelling the answer in play dough. Depending on your class’s ability, you can make this into a fast paced game or keep it as a simple activity.




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Addition, Math

Addition With Counters (Carrying and No Carrying)





This week we are learning about addition with carrying in Math. It is amazing to see  how children of all ages can grasp this concept. From Kindergarten to Primary, the truth is – it’s all about how you teach it! Here are some basic activities we are doing in class that can also be done at home. The best thing about these is they require very little preparation, resources and planning.

Look at the bottom for a link to 1 FREE download to complete this lesson!

Check out my Teachers Pay Teachers page to purchase digital downloads for this lesson!

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What you need:

Remember to look at the bottom for a link to digital downloads + 1 FREE download to complete this lesson!

  1.    Small objects that can be connected (toys, Lego blocks, paperclips, etc.).
  2.    Place value mats (beginner only)
  3.    Addition chart
  4.    Addition cards
        • NOTE: You need to print and cut these out (print these on card paper or colored paper for the best result). Fold along the dashed line to have one side with answers and one side without.
        • Basic – No carrying. These cards use vertical addition without carrying (single digit plus single digit)
        • Easy – No carrying. These cards use vertical addition without carrying (single digit plus double digit)
        • Medium – Carrying. These cards use vertical addition with carrying (single digit plus double digit)
        • Hard – Carrying. These cards use vertical addition with carrying (double digit plus double digit)

Preparation:

All preparation is optional and can be adjusted according to your classroom!

  • Create two piles of the small object (for this example I will use small connector toys). One pile that has single toys and one that has sets of ten connected.
  • Print off the place value mats (beginner only)
  • Print off addition chart(s)
  • Print off and assemble addition cards (fold along dashed line and glue together — these work best when printed on card paper).

How It Works:

There are various things you can do with the resources I have created. Check out the different levels of difficulty and choose the one that suits your group of students best.

        • Easy: Show the student a basic math problem  (use addition cards) and allow them to solve using the connector toys. Start with a problem that does not involve carrying (addition cards – basic). Example: 25 + 3. Allow the students to solve by placing toys into different parts of the place value mat. The student should place 8 single toys in the ‘ones’ column and 2 sticks of ten in the ‘tens column. When the student becomes more advanced allow them to copy the problem into the addition chart.
        • Medium: Next, move onto harder problems (use addition cards – easy/medium)!  Use the addition chart to practice the problems. When the student needs to carry a one have them physically break it off and place it above the ‘tens’ column on the addition chart.
        • Hard: Show students a combination of easy and hard questions (use addition cards – hard).  Or, time your student and see how many questions they can get correct! Play again to see if they can beat their first round.
        • Group work: If you are teaching a class you can use any level (beginner – advanced). Split the class into groups and select a student to choose a problem from the addition cards. Write the problem on the board and give the students one minute to solve by placing the correct number of connector toys on their addition chart. When the student has completed their answer have them race to put a teddy bear into a basket. The first team to place the teddy bear inside will get to show the answer to the class and receive one point. The first team to receive 5 points wins!

EASY:

Use the place value chart for beginner students. This can help them identify the difference between the ‘ones’ and ‘tens’ column before moving onto addition with carrying.

For this example the place value chart shows the number 14 (1 stick of 10 in the ‘tens’ column and 4 single ones in the ‘ones’ column).



MEDIUM:

Use the addition cards and addition chart for students that know the difference between the ‘ones’ and ‘tens’ column. If you don’t have any connector toys at home try using paperclips or even scraps of paper! Once the students become familiar, allow them to practice writing instead of using the connector toys

For this example the addition chart shows 14 + 6. The students can also practice adding and show the answer using more toys!



HARD:

Use the addition cards and addition chart to challenge advanced students. Try timing them to see how many questions they can get correct in 1 minute. Then, challenge them to beat their score! If the students are advanced enough try letting them write the answers instead of using the connector toys.



GROUP WORK:

Have your students challenge each other! Use a recycled tissue roll to make a card holder. One student can sit on the side with the question (and solve it) and the other on the side with the answer (to check their friend’s work). 




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