Addition, Math

Addition With Counters (Carrying and No Carrying)





This week we are learning about addition with carrying in Math. It is amazing to see  how children of all ages can grasp this concept. From Kindergarten to Primary, the truth is – it’s all about how you teach it! Here are some basic activities we are doing in class that can also be done at home. The best thing about these is they require very little preparation, resources and planning.

Look at the bottom for a link to 1 FREE download to complete this lesson!

Check out my Teachers Pay Teachers page to purchase digital downloads for this lesson!

Click here!



What you need:

Remember to look at the bottom for a link to digital downloads + 1 FREE download to complete this lesson!

  1.    Small objects that can be connected (toys, Lego blocks, paperclips, etc.).
  2.    Place value mats (beginner only)
  3.    Addition chart
  4.    Addition cards
        • NOTE: You need to print and cut these out (print these on card paper or colored paper for the best result). Fold along the dashed line to have one side with answers and one side without.
        • Basic – No carrying. These cards use vertical addition without carrying (single digit plus single digit)
        • Easy – No carrying. These cards use vertical addition without carrying (single digit plus double digit)
        • Medium – Carrying. These cards use vertical addition with carrying (single digit plus double digit)
        • Hard – Carrying. These cards use vertical addition with carrying (double digit plus double digit)

Preparation:

All preparation is optional and can be adjusted according to your classroom!

  • Create two piles of the small object (for this example I will use small connector toys). One pile that has single toys and one that has sets of ten connected.
  • Print off the place value mats (beginner only)
  • Print off addition chart(s)
  • Print off and assemble addition cards (fold along dashed line and glue together — these work best when printed on card paper).

How It Works:

There are various things you can do with the resources I have created. Check out the different levels of difficulty and choose the one that suits your group of students best.

        • Easy: Show the student a basic math problem  (use addition cards) and allow them to solve using the connector toys. Start with a problem that does not involve carrying (addition cards – basic). Example: 25 + 3. Allow the students to solve by placing toys into different parts of the place value mat. The student should place 8 single toys in the ‘ones’ column and 2 sticks of ten in the ‘tens column. When the student becomes more advanced allow them to copy the problem into the addition chart.
        • Medium: Next, move onto harder problems (use addition cards – easy/medium)!  Use the addition chart to practice the problems. When the student needs to carry a one have them physically break it off and place it above the ‘tens’ column on the addition chart.
        • Hard: Show students a combination of easy and hard questions (use addition cards – hard).  Or, time your student and see how many questions they can get correct! Play again to see if they can beat their first round.
        • Group work: If you are teaching a class you can use any level (beginner – advanced). Split the class into groups and select a student to choose a problem from the addition cards. Write the problem on the board and give the students one minute to solve by placing the correct number of connector toys on their addition chart. When the student has completed their answer have them race to put a teddy bear into a basket. The first team to place the teddy bear inside will get to show the answer to the class and receive one point. The first team to receive 5 points wins!

EASY:

Use the place value chart for beginner students. This can help them identify the difference between the ‘ones’ and ‘tens’ column before moving onto addition with carrying.

For this example the place value chart shows the number 14 (1 stick of 10 in the ‘tens’ column and 4 single ones in the ‘ones’ column).



MEDIUM:

Use the addition cards and addition chart for students that know the difference between the ‘ones’ and ‘tens’ column. If you don’t have any connector toys at home try using paperclips or even scraps of paper! Once the students become familiar, allow them to practice writing instead of using the connector toys

For this example the addition chart shows 14 + 6. The students can also practice adding and show the answer using more toys!



HARD:

Use the addition cards and addition chart to challenge advanced students. Try timing them to see how many questions they can get correct in 1 minute. Then, challenge them to beat their score! If the students are advanced enough try letting them write the answers instead of using the connector toys.



GROUP WORK:

Have your students challenge each other! Use a recycled tissue roll to make a card holder. One student can sit on the side with the question (and solve it) and the other on the side with the answer (to check their friend’s work). 




Check out my Teachers Pay Teachers page to purchase digital downloads for this lesson!

Click here!




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